Douglas Ljungkvist

www.DouglasLjunkvist.com

Douglas has this to say about his work:

I am a Brooklyn-based photographer originally from Sweden. My personal work is intuitive, self expressive, and about feeling and mood.  Attributes to describe my personal work include urban, graphic, vernacular, and quiet.  I am drawn to color, space, lines, and form.

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Dave Hebb

www.DaveHebb.com

Dave has this to say about his work:

The natural environment, our industrial and technological infrastructure, and my place within them, are the focus of my work as a visual artist.

Timescapes, my most recent body of work, uses photography and video to document the transformation of various landscapes over long spans of time.

Questions about the long-term global impact that industrialized civilization has on the environment are framed within the context of my own rural surroundings in the Catskill Mountains of New York.

This relationship with nature is investigated by examining long term natural effects on industrial artifacts within the landscape, such as a discarded computer monitor or sewer drainage pipe.

I invite the viewer to contemplate their own relationship with nature as a formal meditation while also implying complicity in its destruction and ultimate responsibility for conserving natural resources and preserving what’s left of our natural environment.

Susan May Tell

www.SusanMayTell.com

Susan has this to say about her project called A Requiem: Tribute to the Spiritual Space at Auschwitz:

In Auschwitz, I felt the presence of its ghosts guiding me, guiding my camera, and was then, and continue to be now, moved to share this place’s tale of tragedy through the images I saw through my lens.

I arrived there almost by happenstance. While planning a trip to Prague and Budapest, I learned that an overnight train goes from Prague to Krakow – and from there it was a short local train ride to Auschwitz.

I walked the grounds in silence, in meditation, photographing the aesthetics, the mood, the sense of foreboding – and tried to capture the energy that lives in that space.

Equally important to my artistic vision is my commitment to Auschwitz as a meditation on decay and memory. Like others’ sacred grounds that are decaying, Auschwitz today is disappearing and raises questions about whether places of this kind should be restored and the importance of memory and commemoration.

 

 

Lauren Henkin

www.LaurenHenkin.com

Lauren has this to say about her project called Still Standing, Standing Still:

One of the issues I struggle with in my life is being open. I think it stems from a fear of being judged, that in knowing the real me, I will be found lacking in some capacity and abandoned. It’s something I’ve tried to work through, a lack of faith in anything that would endure.

It is one of the reasons I wanted to become an architect. I thought that in imagining these built forms, I was creating something that would remain, something I could construct that would stand long after I was gone. It is also the reason why I’m so drawn to photographing the natural world, especially near urban areas.

Repeatedly, the subjects that I find engaging are the ones that survive in an environment meant to exterminate as a way to answer the questions I continually grapple with: What is permanent? Will anything last?

I became obsessed with this lone tree’s form and photographed it more intensely than any subject I have ever focused on. It was alone, with its scars unclothed, threatened by vines, but still standing. I was moved by its quiet beauty and strength, within it a humble model of perseverance and survival.

 

Lisa M. Robinson

www.LisaMRobinson.com

Lisa has this to say about her work:

For the past five years, I have been making photographs in the snow and ice. I am interested in metaphor, and have sought to comprehend our human place in this world.

On the surface, these images are quite beautiful. They appear elegantly simple and accessible, evoking, perhaps, the silent tranquility that one might feel after a fresh snowfall.

Beneath the surface, however, there is a subtle tension. Like fine haiku, each image quietly references another season, a time of life or activity that has already passed, and may come again.

Throughout the series run the leitmotifs of poles and ropes and a palette of man-made color. The relationship between the human and the natural world becomes more tightly intertwined as the series progresses, and the cycles of life and death and transformation fold inward.

This interest in time passage and life cycles becomes distilled in explorations of water itself. Ice, snow, fog and water embody the liminal states of a primary element. At times, the multiple forms exist simultaneously.

It is as though the thing itself possesses its own counterpoint and transformation is a constant condition, despite seeming moments of stillness.

Frank Gohlke

www.FrankGohlke.com

Aaron Siskind

www.AaronSiskind.org

This is from the Aaron Siskind Foundation website:

Photographer and educator Aaron Siskind (1903-1991) holds a preeminent place in the history of American photography.

Beginning his photographic career in the 1930’s as a social documentarian with the New York Photo League, he ultimately radicalized the medium by emphasizing the photograph as an abstract form of expression and an aesthetic end in itself.

Siskind taught in New York City’s public schools for 25 years before becoming recognized as a photographer and then a gifted pioneer of photographic education.

His vision and methods have and will continue to inspire and instruct future generations of artists and teachers.

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